My 2013/14 season in pictures

My 2013/14 season in pictures

The 2013/14 season finishes officially at the end of this week, but I had my last performance on Tuesday, so I’m effectively on summer break now.

I need it. It’s been a really big season (but a great one!). I was in five new productions (and rehearsed a sixth, which I’ll do first in the coming season):

Cristiano in Un ballo in maschera (Verdi) – it’s a bit of a cough and spit part, so I didn’t manage to find a photo, but I did get a mention in one review:

In the small cameo of Cristiano, Andrew Finden took charge of the stage and made every phrase count, with his pleasing baritone and animated presence producing a solid impression.

The next premiere was J. Strauss’s operette Die Fledermaus, in which I played a freudian Dr Falke, a role I had done previously in Nuernberg:

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In February came the annual Handel Festival, and I had the pleasure of taking part in a candle-lit, baroque-gesture production of Riccardo Primo (featuring the insanely talented Franco Fagioli). As you can see, my character Berardo, was the trusty sidekick (#friendzoned) to Costanza (Emily Hindrichs):

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The costumes and set were exquisite, so check out the rest of the photos here and here.

Then came the longest opera ever… Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, where I played one of the Meisters, Konrad Nachtigall. One of my props was a live teacup poodle named Popcorn, who managed to upstage us all.

KS Eddie Gauntt as Beckmesser, Renatus Meszar as Hans Sachs, Guido Jentjens as Pogner Photo: Falk von Traubenberg

Renatus Meszar as Hans Sachs, Guido Jentjens as Pogner
Photo: Falk von Traubenberg

KS Eddie Gauntt as Beckmesser, Renatus Meszar as Hans Sachs, Guido Jentjens as Pogner Photo: Falk von Traubenberg

KS Eddie Gauntt as Beckmesser, Renatus Meszar as Hans Sachs, Guido Jentjens as Pogner
Photo: Falk von Traubenberg

This season’s foray into frech repertoire was a double bill of Ravel’s
L’enfant et les sortilèges and Stravinsky’s La Rossignol, in which I played a handful of parts: the Father, Clock and the Cat in the Ravel, and a courtier and Japanese Ambassador in the the Stravinsky. At least my ‘Stummauftritt’ makes an appearance in the video:

I was also involved in the final Premiere of the season, Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunow, although I’ve done a dress rehearsal already, my first performance is the revival at the beginning of next season.

as Schtschelkalow Photo: Falk von Traubenberg

as Schtschelkalow
Photo: Falk von Traubenberg

In addition to new productions, I did performances of five revivals, most of which I’d already done in previous seasons. The only new role to me was Ned Keene in Britten’s masterpiece Peter Grimes in the powerful production by Christopher Alden. I was also glad to have been able to share the stage for a performance with John Treleaven, who is arguably one of the great interpreters of the title role.

Jaco Venter (Balstrode), Kammersänger Klaus Schneider (Peter Grimes), Andrew Finden (Ned Keene) Foto: Jochen Klenk

Jaco Venter (Balstrode), Kammersänger Klaus Schneider (Peter Grimes), Andrew Finden (Ned Keene)
Foto: Jochen Klenk

There were two Mozart roles which I love: the count in Le nozze di Figaro

 

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and the everyman Papageno in Die Zauberflöte

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Marullo in Verdi’s Rigoletto is another little cough and spit number, but it’s probably one of the things I’ve performed the most, and in fact, the first new production I did in Karlsruhe.

I’m very glad that we revived the incredibly powerful production of Weinberg’s The Passenger. I wrote at the time about meeting the author Sofia Pozmysz, and it remains one of the most powerful pieces of theater I’ve had the privilege to be a part of.

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I also took part in he Christmas concerts, and a New Year’s concert of Bernstein:

 

I’ll be reprising a number of these parts again in revivals next season, along with Schaunard in new productions of Puccini’s La Boheme and Oreste in Gluck’s Iphegenie en Tauride.

But first, a few weeks in Australia!!

A.

What do you think?